Orlando Immigration Court: Information Guide

Orlando Immigration Court Overview

The Orlando Immigration Court, located in Orlando, Florida, is in charge of resolving deportation cases for non-citizens in Central Florida. Florida has 3 immigration courts and the Orlando court has 8 judges.

In addition to hearing cases in person, the judges at the Orlando court hear cases from people at jails in Orlando or any other nearby counties. For example, they hear cases from people at:

  • Bradenton Detention Center
  • Fpc (Folkston Ice Processing Center)
  • Florida United Methodist Children’s Home
  • Gulf Coast Jewish Family & Community Services
  • Orlando Immigration Court
  • Bethany Christian Services of Orlando
  • Lutheran Services Florida – Dream Center
  • Urban Strategies-Refugio Ignite
  • Urban Strategies-Refugio Iglesia De Dios Tfc

In this guide, we will provide you with all the information you need about the Orlando, Florida Immigration Court including its address, contact information, processing time, and other important information and data.

Orlando Immigration Court Contact Information

Address

The Orlando Immigration Court is located at:

3535 Lawton Road, Suite 200
Orlando, FL 32803

Phone number

407-722-8900

You can use this number to contact the court clerks and/or the immigration judges’ legal assistants for any information you want.

For more information about the best ways to check your immigration court date or check the status of your immigration case, visit our page.

Hours

The court is open from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm and then from 12:30 pm to 4:00 pm, Monday-Friday.
Although the Window is closed for Filings at 3:00 pm, Monday-Friday, the phone is answered until 4 pm.

Getting to the Orlando Immigration Court

Orlando Immigration Court

The Immigration Court in Orlando is inside the Hollister Building. It is near Lake Theresa.

To get there, you can take the E Colonial Dr, then Herndon Ave and McCullough Ave. After that, turn onto Maguire Blvd, then to Lawton Rd and you will find the court in the Hollister Building.

What the court looks like

From the front, the Orlando court looks like this:

Orlando Immigration Court

The back of the court building looks like this:

Orlando Immigration Court

Immigration Judges in Orlando

8 judges are serving in the Orlando Immigration Court with judge H. Kevin Mart, acting as Assistant Chief Immigration Judge.

Here is the list of the 8 judges serving at the Orlando court:

  • Yon K. Alberdi
  • Richard A. Jamadar
  • Victoria L. Ghartey
  • Stuart F. Karden
  • James K. Grim
  • Elizabeth G. Lang
  • Monique Harris
  • Jennifer L. Page-Lozano

Of the 8 previous judges, Judge Jennifer has the highest asylum denial rate (96.3%), and Judge Monique has the second-highest denial rate (86.2%). On the other hand, Judge Jennifer has the lowest grant rate (3.7%) while Judge Victoria has the highest grant rate (23.2%)

Getting a Bond at the Orlando Immigration Court

The Orlando Immigration Court does not have an immigration bond form available online.

The Immigration Court in Orlando has heard 8,373 bond cases since 2000. 3,256 of these cases were granted while 5,117 were denied. In other words, the court has denied about 61% of the cases heard since 2000.

Mexican Nationals come in the first place regarding the bond hearings with total cases of 2,488. 954 of these cases were granted while 1,534 were not.

In addition, the Nationals of Guatemala comes in second place with total cases of 715. 291of these cases were granted while 424 were not.

Asylum Decisions in Orlando

Asylum Denial Rates in Orlando

The court has considered 19,180 asylum cases since 2000. 16,095 cases were represented while 3,085 were not presented.
10,072 of the represented cases were denied while 6,023 cases were granted. In other words, about 62% of asylum cases were denied.

This percentage is moderate. Compared to other immigration courts such as the Immigration Court in New York and the Immigration Court in Los Angeles, the Immigration Court in Orlando has a moderate approval rate.

Nationalities

Haiti comes in the first place of asylum seekers before the court. Since 2000, it has heard 4,399 asylum cases from Haitians.

Moreover, Colombia comes in second place. Since 2000, it has heard 4,269 asylum cases from Colombians.

Furthermore, Honduras comes in third place. Since 2000, it has heard 1,734 asylum cases from Hondurasians.

Backlog and Wait Time in Orlando

There are 70,724 pending cases in front of the Immigration Court in Orlando. This is a high backlog when compared to other immigration courts in other states such as Texas and California.

The average waiting time to resolve an immigration case is 611 days, which is faster than immigration courts in Florida and other states. For example, The Miami Immigration Court takes an average of 720 days to resolve a case while the San Antonio Immigration Court takes about 1,006 days.

Free Lawyers for the Orlando Immigration Court

5 organizations offer their free legal services to people at the Immigration Court in Orlando. It is highly recommended to use a free lawyer when you can, but it may have some downsides as well.  If you want to find out more about how to get legal help with your immigration case, visit our Immigration Court Page.

Catholic Charities of Central Florida

This organization limits its services to non-detained persons. Besides, it provides services for native Spanish, Portuguese, Haitian Creole, and French who do not speak English.

1771 North Semoran Boulevard, Suite C
Orlando, FL 32807
Tel: (407) 658-0110
Fax: (407) 601-0738
www.cflcc.org

Orlando Center for Justice

This organization provides legal services for native Spanish and Portuguese people who do not speak English.

1300 N. Semoran Boulevard, Suite 120
Orlando, FL 32807
Tel: (407)279-1802
info@orlandojustice.org
www.orlandojustice.org

 

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