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What is the Record of Proceedings (ROP) in Immigration Court?

If the government is trying to deport you or a family member, then it must file paperwork against you with an immigration court.   There are over 60 immigration courts in the U.S. and the government must file with one of them.

When the government files with one of the immigration courts, it creates a record or folder.  The immigration court calls this the “Record of Proceedings.”  It is sometimes called the ROP for short.  

The easiest way to understand it, is the ROP is everything the government has filed with the court as evidence to try to deport you. 

For this reason, you need to know what the government is telling the judge about your case to defend yourself. 

Can I get a copy of the Record of Proceedings (ROP) for my Court Case?

Yes, you have an absolute right to see what documents the government has filed with the immigration court.  In fact, the government is supposed to mail you a copy of whatever it sent to the court.  

Sometimes, however, the government doesn’t have your current address or the documents it filed gets lost.  For this reason you can, and should, request a copy of your ROP directly from the immigration court.

How it Works

  • Pay a one-time fee of $50.00 
  • Find out your alien number
  • Answer a few simple questions
  • We’ll email you a completed, signed form with all the instructions you need.

FAQ

  • What’s in your immigration court file?
  • Do I need a lawyer to get my immigration court file?
  • Is the Record of Proceedings (ROP) important?

The ROP is extremely important.  The ROP is the only thing an immigration judge considers when deciding whether the government can deport you.  

Remember, the immigration judge doesn’t deport you, the government does.  The immigration judge decides whether it’s legal for the government to remove you from the U.S. 

For this reason, you need to know what the government is telling the judge about your case to defend yourself. 

  • What is the Record of Proceedings (ROP) in Immigration Court?

If the government is trying to deport you or a family member, then it must file paperwork against you with an immigration court.   There are over 60 immigration courts in the U.S. and the government must file with one of them.

When the government files with one of the immigration courts, it creates a record or folder.  The immigration court calls this the “Record of Proceedings.”  It is sometimes called the ROP for short.  

The easiest way to understand it, is the ROP is everything the government has filed with the court as evidence to try to deport you. 

For this reason, you need to know what the government is telling the judge about your case to defend yourself.

Immigration Bros, LLC forms or templates and other self-help instructions or other services does not constitute legal representation and are not a substitute for advice or services of a licensed attorney; If prior to purchasing any forms or templates and other self-help service or instructions from Immigration Bros, LLC, I believe these items, documents, or other instructions to be legal advice, service or opinion then I will not proceed with any purchase; I agree that Immigration Bros, LLC will not review my answers for accuracy, and I will be solely responsible for reading and reviewing any documents before signing it; Limitation of Liability and Indemnification. Except where otherwise prohibited by law, I will hold Immigration Bros, LLC and its officers, directors, or agents harmless for any indirect, direct, or other consequential damage regardless of how such damage occurs.  This includes any attorney’s fees and related costs of litigation; I understand that these Terms require the use of arbitration on an individual basis to resolve disputes, rather than jury trials or class actions, and limit the remedies available to me in the event of a dispute; All purchases made through Immigration Bros, LLC are final and nonrefundable or exchangeable regardless of any outcome. I understand my purchase I shall have no right to cancel, request a cash refund or obtain store credit; I understand that these terms affect my legal rights and obligations.

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Immigration Court Record



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